M-Audio M3-8 Review

M Audio M38

Function: Studio Monitors

Price: $349.99 (Each)

What’s New: The M3-8s are the newest studio monitors from M-Audio.  A three-way design, The M3-8 sports a low, mid, and high driver and enough power for any studio application. 

 

Features:  Housed in an attractive wood cabinet, the M3-8 features an 8” woofer, 5” mid driver and a 1” tweeter.  The midrange and high drivers are set inline to aid with stereo imaging and provides a unique look to the monitors.  Controls are all placed on the rear panel and include volume, low, mid, and high EQ controls, EQ on/bypass switch, and a low cut switch that filters out frequencies at either 80Hz or 100Hz.  Inputs include balanced XLR and TRS and unbalanced RCA in. 

 

Sound:  Right away I could tell the M3-8s were going to be a lot of fun.  At 220 Watts, the M3-8s provide plenty of volume and sound great at loud volumes.   After playing with the EQ controls, I found a setting that sounded good and flat in my room, and started playing music to get a sense of how the monitors responded.  The first thing I noticed was the bass.  In my small (but well treated) room, I was hearing low end like I never did before!  You don’t just hear low end with the M3-8s, you experience it.  Dance, hip-hop, and rock and roll sounded phenomenal!  In addition to deep, punchy bass, the midrange was smooth and worked nicely with the top end, which was clear and not harsh at all.  Working all day, I had very little ear fatigue with the M3-8s, which came as a relief after years of working NS10s (which fatigue my ears on a daily basis!).  A note of caution, be sure not to lay the monitors on their side, it messes with the stereo imaging quite a bit, and gives a false sense of the width of your mix. 

 

Bottom Line:  The M3-8s are a producer’s dream.  Powerful and loud enough for any situation, huge frequency response, deep bass balanced with smooth midrange and top end M3-8s are a great pair of monitors and a ton of fun, especially when programming or working up tracks.  The added midrange driver sets the M3-8 apart from most studio monitors in its price range and makes a huge difference in the sound and stereo imaging. Depending on your room, you’ll probably need to EQ the speakers to your taste, but once set, the M3-8 delivers a pure, smooth sound that will stand with any other monitor in its class.

 

For more information about the M3-8s and other products by Maudio, visit maudio.com

-Andy Toy
Tech Editor, WL mag

 

Holiday Gift Guide

Giftguide2013_eblast-top

CHOOSE ONE:

MusicMultiMediaResourcesMusicOnlineServicesTraining

ABOUT WORSHIP LEADER’S ADVERTISING PARTNER’S GIFT-GIVING GUIDE
We asked our ministry partners which gifts they suggested for worship leaders and their teams. Some of them jumped in with suggestions that span a board array of worship resources and products for your ministry.

NEXT PAGE: GEAR

The Blessing Life: A Journey to Unexpected Joy

1-blessing lifeGerrit Dawson
IVP

Blessing is a word that gets tossed around a lot; Gerrit Dawson, through both personal stories and scriptural insights, clears up any confusion about its intrinsic meaning. He invites you into a life of receiving God’s blessing, returning blessing to God, and reflecting blessing to others. An additional Guide to The Blessing Life: 40 Days of Scripture and Prayer is the perfect accompaniment to integrate the book’s principles and promise into living reality.

Andrea Hunter

 

Beginning Worship Guitar Course

1-musicademyMusicademy
musicademy.com

Bringing the basics of guitar playing to the worship musician

This training course is perfect for the beginner. Musicademy starts from the ground up with the very basics of guitar playing on this all new Beginning Worship Guitar Course. Teaching proper technique this 4 DVD series has the ability to take the learner from beginner to competent player in just a few months.

Do not be fooled by this beginner course! Musicademy has done a great job of creating a very hefty bit of learning in these 10 hours of guitar lessons. Along the way tests are provided to increase learning and challenge the student to excellence. Musicademy also offers backing tracks to play along with that will help train you to listen to the musicians around you while playing in a band setting. Online resources are also readily available.

This program is perfect for worshipers of any age who desire to become efficient with a guitar.

List Price: $99.99
Sale Price: $89.99

 

PreSonus Eris E8 Review

artworks-000046319418-efq458-crop
Function: Studio Monitors
Price: $249.95 (each)
What’s NewThe Eris E8s are brand new two-way speakers from PreSonus.  Joined by their little brother the E5s, the Eris line is PreSonus’ first foray into the world of studio monitors, with outstanding results. 
 
Features:  The E8s come in a sleek, all black enclosure with a little blue logo that lights up when they power on.  All inputs are in the rear, including XLR, balanced TRS, and unbalanced RCA line ins.  In addition to standard input gain, the E8s have an “Acoustic Tuning” section of low, midrange, and high frequency controls.  The E8s also feature an “Acoustic Space” control that cuts the low frequencies at 800 Hz by 2 or 4 dB, for control over bass buildup when monitors are placed close against a wall.  The frequency response is an incredible 35 Hz – 22kHz, quite impressive for 8-inch woofers and perfect for mixing without a sub.  At 130 watts, the E8s provide plenty of volume for any listening environment.
 
Sound:  The Eris E8s sounded great the minute I plugged them into my Apogee Quartet.  I work in a small, well-treated room and have my desk about two thirds of the way into the room, so I didn’t need to utilize the “Acoustic Space” feature on the E8s.  The switch works quite well though, and can be quite useful in small rooms where space is tight and monitors need to be placed near the wall.  I tend to be a “set flat and forget” type of engineer, so I set all the EQs flat and the gains to unity and fired them up.  Right away I was blown away by the depth and three-dimensional nature of the speakers.  They had great stereo imaging, deep bass, clear highs, and the midrange was not overemphasized at all.  After listening to some of my favorite records I decided to try some tracking.  I was particularly impressed with the high-mids and top end, the E8s offer a lot of detail but don’t hype the high mids at all, so listening and working for long periods don’t fatigue my ears (something that has plagued me for years using NS-10s).  The low end is quite nice on the E8s and provides detail and focus for making bass and kick tight and punchy.  I did a quick mix of a demo I was working on and it translated wonderfully in my car, iPhone, and laptop without any tweaks (to my relief).  Overall the Eris E8s are quite balanced and let me listen for hours without any ear fatigue. 
 
Bottom Line:  This is the best pair of monitors under $500 that we’ve heard.  The fact that my ears didn’t get tired after 8 hours of using the E8s is a huge deal. I engineered a session all day long and never felt uncomfortable in the least.  If you have enough space for 8” woofers, there’s nothing not to like about these monitors.  At just $499 for the pair, they easily outpace other contenders in their price range in sound quality and features, and the added EQs make them a great option in less than ideal listening conditions.
 
For more information about the Eris E8s and other products by PreSonus, visit PreSonus.com.