Beginning Worship Guitar Course

1-musicademyMusicademy
musicademy.com

Bringing the basics of guitar playing to the worship musician

This training course is perfect for the beginner. Musicademy starts from the ground up with the very basics of guitar playing on this all new Beginning Worship Guitar Course. Teaching proper technique this 4 DVD series has the ability to take the learner from beginner to competent player in just a few months.

Do not be fooled by this beginner course! Musicademy has done a great job of creating a very hefty bit of learning in these 10 hours of guitar lessons. Along the way tests are provided to increase learning and challenge the student to excellence. Musicademy also offers backing tracks to play along with that will help train you to listen to the musicians around you while playing in a band setting. Online resources are also readily available.

This program is perfect for worshipers of any age who desire to become efficient with a guitar.

List Price: $99.99
Sale Price: $89.99

 

PreSonus Eris E8 Review

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Function: Studio Monitors
Price: $249.95 (each)
What’s NewThe Eris E8s are brand new two-way speakers from PreSonus.  Joined by their little brother the E5s, the Eris line is PreSonus’ first foray into the world of studio monitors, with outstanding results. 
 
Features:  The E8s come in a sleek, all black enclosure with a little blue logo that lights up when they power on.  All inputs are in the rear, including XLR, balanced TRS, and unbalanced RCA line ins.  In addition to standard input gain, the E8s have an “Acoustic Tuning” section of low, midrange, and high frequency controls.  The E8s also feature an “Acoustic Space” control that cuts the low frequencies at 800 Hz by 2 or 4 dB, for control over bass buildup when monitors are placed close against a wall.  The frequency response is an incredible 35 Hz – 22kHz, quite impressive for 8-inch woofers and perfect for mixing without a sub.  At 130 watts, the E8s provide plenty of volume for any listening environment.
 
Sound:  The Eris E8s sounded great the minute I plugged them into my Apogee Quartet.  I work in a small, well-treated room and have my desk about two thirds of the way into the room, so I didn’t need to utilize the “Acoustic Space” feature on the E8s.  The switch works quite well though, and can be quite useful in small rooms where space is tight and monitors need to be placed near the wall.  I tend to be a “set flat and forget” type of engineer, so I set all the EQs flat and the gains to unity and fired them up.  Right away I was blown away by the depth and three-dimensional nature of the speakers.  They had great stereo imaging, deep bass, clear highs, and the midrange was not overemphasized at all.  After listening to some of my favorite records I decided to try some tracking.  I was particularly impressed with the high-mids and top end, the E8s offer a lot of detail but don’t hype the high mids at all, so listening and working for long periods don’t fatigue my ears (something that has plagued me for years using NS-10s).  The low end is quite nice on the E8s and provides detail and focus for making bass and kick tight and punchy.  I did a quick mix of a demo I was working on and it translated wonderfully in my car, iPhone, and laptop without any tweaks (to my relief).  Overall the Eris E8s are quite balanced and let me listen for hours without any ear fatigue. 
 
Bottom Line:  This is the best pair of monitors under $500 that we’ve heard.  The fact that my ears didn’t get tired after 8 hours of using the E8s is a huge deal. I engineered a session all day long and never felt uncomfortable in the least.  If you have enough space for 8” woofers, there’s nothing not to like about these monitors.  At just $499 for the pair, they easily outpace other contenders in their price range in sound quality and features, and the added EQs make them a great option in less than ideal listening conditions.
 
For more information about the Eris E8s and other products by PreSonus, visit PreSonus.com.

2013 Holiday Gift Guide

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CHOOSE ONE: 

MusicMultiMediaResourcesMusicOnlineServicesTraining

ABOUT WORSHIP LEADER’S ADVERTISING PARTNER’S GIFT-GIVING GUIDE
We asked our ministry partners which gifts they suggested for worship leaders and their teams.  Some of them jumped in with suggestions that span a board array of worship resources and products for your ministry.

NEXT PAGE: GEAR

The Jesus Prayer

jesus prayerJohn Michael Talbot
IVP
Worship leader Pick

Far more than a call to revisit the early Christian “Jesus Prayer,” this is a reader’s digest of the history, theology, and doctrinal development of the Church. It also includes personal history from seminal worship artist John Michael Talbot, providing a meaningful bridge between Catholics, Orthodox, and evangelicals (as well as a reach to those of other faiths). A valuable resource for worship writers with its rich and engaging focus on Jesus.

Andrea Hunter

 

M-Audio Axiom AIR 49 Review

axiom_air_49_media
Function: MIDI Controller
Price: $399.99
 
What’s New: For years, the M-Audio Axiom line has set the standard for MIDI controllers with unbeatable quality, flexibility and keyboard feel, and the brand new AIR 49 is no exception.  The AIR 49 is a 49-key, synth-action MIDI controller with an abundance of knobs, faders and pads, and “Hypercontrol” built-in smart mapping software.  With the AIR incarnation of controllers, the Axiom line gets both a physical and internal overhaul that keeps all the great things about the original and adds a few pretty awesome bells and whistles. 
 
Features:  The keys, as expected, feel amazing and the piano-style keys make it ideal for both synths and piano.  The orange backlighting is a nice change from the classic Axiom blue, and the screen is tilted up to make it easier to see the control screen from the front.  The back port features an on/off switch, power supply in, MIDI I/O, USB and inputs for sustain and expression pedals.  Eight knobs, nine faders, nine buttons, (including dedicated playback control), twelve pads, and pitch and mod wheels round out the control surface, which is beautifully laid out and labeled.  Everything on the control surface can be assigned to 3 different MIDI banks, and the colors change depending on which bank is currently selected.  The pads are velocity and pressure-sensitive and feel great for drum programming or sample triggering.  Hypercontrol works just like it claims, mapping everything on the control surface to perfection on almost all the popular DAWs.  One of my favorite features on the AIR 49 is that each rotary knob will light up one at a time when you turn it, making it easy to keep track of which knob you’re currently using.  For example, if you’re using a knob to pan a guitar, then want to turn it up a bit and listen back, you can easily see which knob controls the guitar pan if you want to keep tweaking it during playback. 
 
Build: At just under 11 pounds, the Axiom AIR 49 is extremely light (especially compared to my 16 lb original Axiom 49) but feels rock solid on a stand or desk.  The white and aluminum finish is sleek and modern looking, vaguely reminiscent of the Axiom Pro series but making the statement that the AIR is a different controller entirely.  The back even has a space to run cables under the keyboard to hide cords and prevent tangling.  My favorite feature on the new look is that the faders are thick and flat, making them almost impossible to break off and lose (which happened to all but three of mine on my 8-year old touring Axiom).
 
Software:  Included with the Axiom 49 is a copy of Ignite by Air Music Technology, ProTools Express, and believe it or not, an iLok 2 for Windows or Mac.  Claiming to be a musician-centric recording software, Ignite looked more to me like a mini-fridge covered in multi-colored magnets at first, but after a few minutes, it proved to be a lot deeper than my first impression.  First of all, the sounds are great.  Whether you’re looking for a drum kit or string ensemble, all the sounds load fast, sound fantastic and work perfectly with the AIR 49.  The workflow takes a little more time to get used to (especially if you’re used to working in a more traditional DAW) but makes perfect sense once you get the hang of it.  Gone is the linear graph of ProTools or Logic, and in comes clip recording.  In some ways, similar to Ableton Live, Ignite allows you to record different instruments and ideas without having to worry about tracks or MIDI channels, or bus sends.  You record an idea, see it turn up as a brightly colored bar on your screen, play another idea, put them together and thus make a song by stacking all of these ideas together.  While Ignite might not be a mixing substitute for ProTools 11 and Logic X, its fantastic sounds and intuitive interface makes it a perfect entry-level DAW, MIDI sequencer, or songwriting tool.  More than enough to start making and recording music right away, the software bundle is a great value and a fresh look at organizing and capturing musical ideas.  One note of caution, the software including Hypercontrol only works on Macs running Apple Lion or later, (and on PCs running Windows 7 or later) so Snow Leopard or Vista users will need an update to get the full experience of AIR. 
 
Bottom Line:  It’s the hands down the best we’ve seen.  The AIR 49 is by far the best Axiom yet, and the feel, look, and control surface makes it our new favorite MIDI keyboard controller. 
 
Church Use: If you’re looking for a MIDI keyboard that feels great for both synths and pianos, want to trigger loops and tracks, and have control over your entire DAW with a touch of a button, the Axiom AIR is a perfect controller for you.  
 
For more information about the AIR 49 and other products by M-Audio, visit m-audio.com.