Yamaha MOXF6 Review

121588-d4e419d68795140496218aadd6bab935Yamaha MOXF6 Review

Church Use: Synth, MIDI controller and audio interface all in one

Features:  The Yamaha MOXF6 is the newest in a long and highly regarded line of MOTIF family of keyboards.  The MOXF6 aims to be the center of your studio as a USB audio interface, MIDI controller, DAW controller, and the sound of the MOTIF XF synth all in one.  With 61 semi-weighted keys, the MOXF6 is lightweight and highly portable for use on stage and in the studio.

Application:  Drawing on the legendary sound library of the MOTIF XF series, the MOXF6 adds more sounds and effects and utilizes seamless integration with DAW software to create the ultimate keyboard/controller hybrid.  The MOXF6 even has an open slot for Flash memory to expand the sounds using flash cards.  One of the best features of the MOXF6 is the built-in 4-in, 2-out audio interface, allowing recording and playback without the use of an additional audio interface, making it perfect for live use with a computer.  Included with each MOXF is the Cubase AI7 recording software to get you started recording right away.

More:  Great all-in-one package, more portable than any other MOTIF

Less: Weighted keys only available on the 88-key version

Price: $1199.99

For more information visit yamahaproaudio.com

Yamaha HS8 Review

hs8yamaha1_2

Function:  Studio Monitors
Price:  $349.99 (Each)
What’s NewWhen talking about Yamaha studio monitors, the classic NS10M is probably the first thing that comes to conversation.  Since the late 70s, the NS10M has been the workhorse of countless studios and producers because of its pronounced midrange and for being brutally revealing.  The HS8 is the latest studio monitor from Yamaha, and in the tradition of its forefather, offers outstanding sound quality for an extremely accurate mix: a worthy successor of the NS10M for today’s world.
 
Features:  The HS8 is a two-way, bass-reflex, nearfield monitor featuring an 8” woofer and 1” dome tweeter.  Controls include one XLR and one TRS input jack, level control, a high trim switch, and a room control switch that cuts frequencies under 500Hz by 2 or 4 dB when engaged.  With a frequency response of 38Hz to 30kHz, the HS8 provides an extremely wide range of audio. 
 
Sound:  Set up in my small (but well treated) 11×10 room, the HS8s sounded great.  The frequency response was flat and balanced, (even flatter than the older HS80M in my opinion) and stereo imaging was amazing!  The highs were smooth and clear and the lows powerful and present.  Onto the midrange: the mids of the HS8 make them some of the most revealing speakers I’ve ever heard.  Not hyped or accentuated, the midrange reminded me instantly of the classic NS10M sound, laying the vocal bare and letting you hear the true nature of your mix.  I’ve always struggled with ear fatigue using NS-10Ms all day, and the more balanced HS8s helps my ears tremendously.  I found the low end to be tight and present and more than enough for most genres, although if you mix dance or hip-hop, you may want to look at the HS8S subwoofer, made to work perfectly with the HS8 line. 
 
Bottom Line: If you’re looking for monitors that will provide the truest, most accurate mix to help your mixes translate on any system, the HS8 is the perfect speaker for you.  The HS8s offer tremendous quality for the price and sounds great in any environment.  Its balanced sound and even bass distribution makes the HS8 a worthy successor of the NS10M, and in many regards a better speaker to mix music on in today’s world. 
 
Fore more information about the HS8s visit yamaha.com.  

-Andy Toy

Yamaha HPH-MT220 Review

Yamaha mt220 Headphones
Yamaha HPH-MT220 Headphone Review
Price: $249.99
Function: Studio headphones
What’s New:  There’s nothing more important than accurate sound in the studio, and the new Yamaha HPH-MT220 headphones deliver exactly that. 
 
Sound:  Right off the bat, the HPH-MT220 just sound phenomenal.  They deliver great clarity throughout the frequency spectrum and don’t sound hyped in the low end at all.  The top end is very clear without being “smoothed” or brittle and I can listen to the phones for hours without getting ear fatigue from boosted high mids.  I loved the sound of the HPH-MT220 right away and they make great reference headphones.  I’d describe them as accurate and faithful, and I wouldn’t hesitate to make tone decisions while monitoring on the HPH-MT220s. 
 
Fit:  What impressed me the most about the HPH-MT220 was how comfortable they are.  The cups are large and spacious and can be inverted to monitor with just one ear if necessary.  I wear glasses most of the time, and small headphones can hurt my head after long periods of time if they’re not shaped right, but the HPH-MT220’s sat great on my head and I barely noticed them after a while.  The outer earpads are made of a synthetic leatherette, while the insides are filled with memory foam cushions to mold to your ears for comfort. 
 
Bottom Line:  I’ve owned a lot of headphones over the years, and you’ll be hard pressed to find a better-fitting pair of headphones on the market today.  Combined with crystal clear sound quality and a great, simple look, the HPH-MT220’s are definitely a must-have for anyone working extensively on headphones. 
 
Church UseFor monitor engineers, FOH engineers, broadcast and music studios.  

For more information about the HPH-MT220 and other products by Yamaha, visit usa.yamaha.com/products/musical-instruments.