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Amen

Amen

Chuck Fromm

The Five Words of Worship provides a filter to view worship songs  through and aid you in preparing a balanced worship service. Here’s a  helpful guide to assessing which word of worship best describes a song.  (Of course there are many songs and psalms that include all of the words  in varying combinations, but usually one is predominant.) 

Is it centered on communion, the cross and/or the finished work of Christ? Amen

AMEN

The Book of Revelation is a response to the Gospels, much as the  Psalms are a response to the Torah. As a book of worship, it is a fitting  finale to the New Testament in which the pastor, prophet, and poet John  reveals Jesus as the “Amen of Heaven” (Rev 3:14). The Savior’s final  utterance on the cross was “It is finished,” which, in turn, has become the  great Amen of our faith, assuring us that His work is complete. The word  Amen signifies that the sacrifice of the cross seals our covenant with  God. It is thus appropriate that it is also the final word of every Christian’s  prayer and a communal confirmation that what has been said is agreed  to by every individual. 

The basic meaning of the Semitic root of Amen is variously “fixed,”  “firm” or “sure.” The related Hebrew verb also carries the meaning “to  be reliable” and “to be trusted.” The Greek New Testament often renders  the word as “so be it,” while the English Bible translates Amen as both  “verily” or “truly.”  

In its earliest use in scripture, Amen occasionally introduced an  affirmative statement and, in the case of a solemn oath, was often  repeated, expressing the certainty and truthfulness of what preceded and  followed it. As such, it appears fifty-two times in Matthew, Mark and Luke,  and no less than twenty-five times in the Gospel of John.  

This emphatic affirmation has no parallel in Hebrew practice, where  Amen was traditionally a response of the people to a priestly prayer.  

Certainly, it is the appropriate response to a prayer, as in First  Chronicles 16:36 when “All the people said ‘Amen’ and ‘Praise the Lord’”  at the conclusion of public prayer. St. Jerome referred to the custom of  the congregation saying Amen with a united voice as sounding like “the  fall of water or the noise of thunder.”  

Yet, Amen can all too easily slip into mere lip service, reduced to a  ritual formula, repeated without understanding. So much more than the  period at the end of the sentence, Jesus forever reinterpreted Amen to  signify Himself and His finished work.  

ESSENTIALS OF AN AMEN SONG  

1) AFFIRMS THE FINISHED WORK OF JESUS 

2) CONFIRMS THE TRUSTWORTHINESS OF GOD 

3) PROCLAIMS CERTAINTY AND TRUTH 

4) REFLECTS CORPORATE AGREEMENT  

5) EMPHASIZES COVENANT RELATIONSHIP WITH GOD

AMEN SONGS 

1) Forever Chris Tomlin SD26

2) Once Again Matt Redman SD6

3) The Cross Kate Miner SD56

4) Enter This Temple Leeland SD67

5) Only Grace Matthew West SD52

6) Again and Again Shelley Jennings SD49

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More Articles to Checkout

The 5 Words of Worship

The Essentials to a Well-Balanced Life of Worship

Hallelujah

Hosanna

Maranatha

Abba

 

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